Bonnie Zink

Knowledge mobilization, writing, and social media top the discussion list.

Bonnie Zink - Knowledge mobilization, writing, and social media top the discussion list.

#KMbChat PDF: How do knowledge mobilizers “holiday?”

KMbChat-logo-v5(1)

When: Thursday July 30, 2015 at noon EDT

Where: Twitter (follow @KMbChat and the #KMbChat hashtag at the above scheduled date and time)

Topic: How do knowledge Mobilizers “holiday?” with Ali Abbas Mehboob Hirji, Research and Project Coordinator for ORION. (@abbaspeaks)


Download the chat transcript (PDF):


What is this chat all about?

This week’s chat will explore how knowledge mobilizers are using summer down time to prepare for fall. Let’s explore:

  • Down time – Is there really such a thing during the summer?@KMbChat
  • Preparations – How are you preparing for the busier fall months?
  • KMb Activities – Are there any summer professional development opportunities that help you keep your skills sharp? How do you keep mobilizing your knowledge and maintain momentum during the summer months? What do you wrap up? What type of projects do you begin? Is summer a time for analysis?
  • Tools and Methods – Are there any tools or methods that you

July 2015 KMbChat: How do knowledge mobilizers “holiday?”

KMbChat-logo-v5(1)

When: Thursday July 30, 2015 at noon EDT

Where: Twitter (follow @KMbChat and the #KMbChat hashtag at the above scheduled date and time)

Topic: How do knowledge Mobilizers “holiday?” with Ali Abbas Mehboob Hirji, Research and Project Coordinator for ORION. (@abbaspeaks)

What is this chat all about?

This week’s chat will explore how knowledge mobilizers are using summer down time to prepare for fall. Let’s explore:

  • Down time – Is there really such a thing during the summer?@KMbChat
  • Preparations – How are you preparing for the busier fall months?
  • KMb Activities – Are there any summer professional development opportunities that help you keep your skills sharp? How do you keep mobilizing your knowledge and maintain momentum during the summer months? What do you wrap up? What type of projects do you begin? Is summer a time for analysis?
  • Tools and Methods – Are there any tools or methods that you

Live Tweeting During a Crisis!

Social media is part of our everyday lives. Many of us stay up-to-date on world events and get our news by checking into various hashtags. More and more of us are checking our social media platforms for information on the topics and events that matter to us. But some of us are using social media platforms to share our knowledge and experience.

Amidst one of the most dangerous and serious wildfire seasons Saskatchewan has experienced to date, there are a few people who are using social media to not only report facts and figures, but to share the stories of people directly affected by the imminent danger that the wildfires in Northern Saskatchewan present.

Northern Saskatchewan Burns!

Saskatchewan is a tinderbox. Our northern forests are burning at a rate that includes three times as many hectares as what is considered normal. We’ve experienced the largest evacuation in Saskatchewan’s history with over 10 000 people evacuated from their homes and 400 000 hectares burned. These wildfires are dangerously close to destroying homes, cottages, and entire communities.

Many brave men and women are fighting these fires and hope to protect the communities in its path. Additional support from the Canadian Military, firefighters from other provinces and states, and other support people are helping to get this crisis under control. In the mean time, thousands of people are being housed in communities across Alberta and Saskatchewan. Even though they are safe from the fires’ destructive paths, they are worried about their communities and homes.  What will they return to?

 Getting to the heart of the matter…

Government organizations and media outlets are doing a good job reporting various stats and figures to help us better understand the seriousness of this situation. But facts and figures only tell us part of the story. There are a few people helping to tell the stories of the people affected. Let me introduce you to Jaydon Flett (@JadyonONO). She has been live tweeting during this crisis. In 140 characters, Flett showed us the hearts of the people affected.

A Peoples’ Story: Live Tweeting During a Crisis (@JaydonOno)

JOnoJaydon “Ono” Flett is a Cree reporter and correspondent with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Born and raised in Manitoba, Jaydon began her career in film and television. She worked as writer, producer, and assistant director on various projects. Jaydon is now under contract with APTN National News. She is the youngest Aboriginal investigative journalist in North America.

On Thursday (July 2, 2015) Flett made her way through thick layers of ugly, orange smoke and into the community of Sucker River. Sucker River is home to approximately 400 people with two dozen of the residents volunteering to stay behind to protect homes and businesses.

Flett wanted to hear the stories of the people affected by the wildfires. An Elder, Miles Ratt, led her into the community of Sucker River. Almost every building in this community was equipped with a hastily equipped sprinkler system stemming from a muddy pond. Volunteers had chopped down trees to prevent the wildfires from spreading into the community. “There is something eerie about walking through a hazy, abandoned community, where only the clicks and hisses of sprinklers could be heard,” says Flett.

By Saturday (July 4, 2015) the wildfires had grown and the situation was dire. Flett was now in La Ronge and  unable to return to Sucker River. Conservation Officers and firefighters in La Ronge were tense and couldn’t provide any current status updates or other information about the wildfires. Flett finally connected with Chief Tammy Cook-Searson and was told that an immediate mandatory evacuation order was now in effect. The evacuees were directed to report to the local community centre.


Jaydon quickly made her way the community centre, where it was clear that panic had set in. People were arriving with only the clothes on their backs and whatever they could carry. They were confused. They did not know where they were going. They did not know if they’d have a place to stay when they got there. They did not know if or when they’d return home or whether they will have a home to return to. Jaydon wasn’t any more informed than these evacuees and decided to live tweet their stories.

 

 

Using Twitter to tell the story...

Many of us watching this crisis unfold were looking for updates and Flett provided them to us. Not only did she share facts and figures in 140 characters or less, she shared the stories of the evacuees as they were experiencing the evacuation. Here are some of their stories:

 

 

 

The human side of social media...

Flett told us about the human side of this situation. She used Twitter to do it. In 140 characters we were able to connect with folks and empathize with their situation. We understood the uncertainty they faced as they were leaving their homes behind. We felt their fear as they worried about what they were leaving behind. This is the power of social media in action.

 

Social media allows to connect to people. It is about humans connecting to humans. It helps us see the heart behind every story. In this case,Flett's use of Twitter helped many of us connect with these folks and inspired us to take action and help in any way we could. We volunteered. We donated. And we prayed.  If not for her sharing these stories on Twitter we may have missed the most important part of this crisis - the hearts of the people affected.

#KMbChat PDF: One Infographic is Worth a Thousand Reports

When: Thursday June 25, 2015 at noon EST

Where: Twitter #KMbChat

Topic: One Infographic is Worth a Thousand Reports: a visual approach to knowledge mobilization (KMb) 

The PDF transcript of this chat is now available!



Guest Post by Dave Walker, Technical Analyst /Analyste technique
Mental Health Commission of Canada / Commission de la santé mentale du Canada

Visual content is a critical part of any communications toolkit. We are wired to process visual information much faster and more effectively than text-based information, and that makes visual content a powerful and efficient tool for knowledge mobilizers.

What is this chat all about?

Visual content can be incorporated into your communications in many ways. In this chat, we will explore using photos, charts, information graphics, and media other than text, charts, and tables to quickly communicate ideas. We will look at examples of effective visuals, and share ideas about what we have done in the past and what we can do in the future. We will also look at incorporating visuals into reports, presentations, posters, and other communications. Come curious, leave inspired!

Visual Content Creation Resources

Resource links (these will also be shared during the chat):

Come prepared to share your best links!

Who is Dave Walker?

Dave is a technical analyst with the Mental Health Commission of Canada’s (MHCC) Marketing and Communications Department.

Dave has over 25 years of experience in graphic design, video production, visual communication, education, and marketing, including 20 years working in digital media, web design and development, and online strategy. At the Commission, Dave has led a number of digital- and web-oriented knowledge exchange projects, as well as design and development projects for the Commission website. Dave focuses strongly on online methods and techniques of online knowledge exchange, mobilization, and translation.

Dave studied Art History at the University of Toronto before switching into commercial photography at Sheridan College in the early 1990s. He has added several certificates and diplomas in television production, social media, and digital media production since then. He is currently working on a Certificate in Adult Education in eLearning at the University of Calgary, and a Bachelor of Business Administration at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Connect with Dave

#KMbChat – A Visual Approach to #KMb

When: Thursday June 25, 2015 at noon EST

Where: Twitter #KMbChat

Topic: One Infographic is Worth a Thousand Reports: a visual approach to knowledge mobilization (KMb) 



Guest Post by Dave Walker, Technical Analyst /Analyste technique
Mental Health Commission of Canada / Commission de la santé mentale du Canada

Visual content is a critical part of any communications toolkit. We are wired to process visual information much faster and more effectively than text-based information, and that makes visual content a powerful and efficient tool for knowledge mobilizers.

What is this chat all about?

Visual content can be incorporated into your communications in many ways. In this chat, we will explore using photos, charts, information graphics, and media other than text, charts, and tables to quickly communicate ideas. We will look at examples of effective visuals, and share ideas about what we have done in the past and what we can do in the future. We will also look at incorporating visuals into reports, presentations, posters, and other communications. Come curious, leave inspired!

Visual Content Creation Resources

Resource links (these will also be shared during the chat):

Come prepared to share your best links!

Who is Dave Walker?

Dave is a technical analyst with the Mental Health Commission of Canada’s (MHCC) Marketing and Communications Department.

Dave has over 25 years of experience in graphic design, video production, visual communication, education, and marketing, including 20 years working in digital media, web design and development, and online strategy. At the Commission, Dave has led a number of digital- and web-oriented knowledge exchange projects, as well as design and development projects for the Commission website. Dave focuses strongly on online methods and techniques of online knowledge exchange, mobilization, and translation.

Dave studied Art History at the University of Toronto before switching into commercial photography at Sheridan College in the early 1990s. He has added several certificates and diplomas in television production, social media, and digital media production since then. He is currently working on a Certificate in Adult Education in eLearning at the University of Calgary, and a Bachelor of Business Administration at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Connect with Dave

Share the knowledge!

  • June 2015 at NOON EST - June 2015 #KMbChat with @DaveKnowsStuff  Buffer

#KMbChat – #KMb Training and Education

When: Thursday May 28, 2015 at noon EST

Where: Twitter #KMbChat

Topic: Knowledge Mobilization Training and Education

 

 



Download the May 28, 2015 #KMbChat PDF!



Guest Post by Monica Batac

Many people work in or research the area of knowledge mobilization (KMb), but perhaps they call it something other than KMb. Some of us are new in the field, others have been at it for quite some time. While we see the development and recognition of formal and informal roles for knowledge intermediaries and knowledge brokers, we still don’t know much about current KMb-ers:

  • their educational and work backgrounds,
  • the skills and capabilities they brought to their work,
  • the new skills and knowledge they’ve gained on the job,
  • the gaps that exist in their learning, and
  • where might they seek support for that learning

What is this chat about?

Let’s explore the diversity of knowledge mobilization and the diverse people who work in this area. Together, we will:

  • discover who else is in this line of work
  • discuss and explore the various learning learning opportunities for and career pathways to KMb
  • share and learn about professional development, support, and
  • training opportunities

Who is Monica Batac?

Monica Batac is a Master of Professional Communication candidate at Ryerson University (Toronto, Ontario). She is also a Project Coordinator at the Centre for Communicating Research (CCK), Ryerson’s new knowledge mobilization support, service, and research unit within the Faculty of Communication and Design. Monica’s current research and work explores the diversity of practices and perceptions regarding knowledge mobilization across professions, fields, and disciplines. As a teacher, she is also interested in informal and formal learning opportunities for KMb.

Connect with Monica:

KMbChat – Knowledge Mobilization Training and Education with Monica Batac

When: Thursday May 28, 2015 at noon EST

Where: Twitter #KMbChat

Topic: Knowledge Mobilization Training and Education

Guest Post by Monica Batac

Many people work in or research the area of knowledge mobilization (KMb), but perhaps they call it something other than KMb. Some of us are new in the field, others have been at it for quite some time. While we see the development and recognition of formal and informal roles for knowledge intermediaries and knowledge brokers, we still don’t know much about current KMb-ers:

  • their educational and work backgrounds,
  • the skills and capabilities they brought to their work,
  • the new skills and knowledge they’ve gained on the job,
  • the gaps that exist in their learning, and
  • where might they seek support for that learning

What is this chat about?

Let’s explore the diversity of knowledge mobilization and the diverse people who work in this area. Together, we will:

  • discover who else is in this line of work
  • discuss and explore the various learning learning opportunities for and career pathways to KMb
  • share and learn about professional development, support, and
  • training opportunities

Who is Monica Batac?

Monica Batac is a Master of Professional Communication candidate at Ryerson University (Toronto, Ontario). She is also a Project Coordinator at the Centre for Communicating Research (CCK), Ryerson’s new knowledge mobilization support, service, and research unit within the Faculty of Communication and Design. Monica’s current research and work explores the diversity of practices and perceptions regarding knowledge mobilization across professions, fields, and disciplines. As a teacher, she is also interested in informal and formal learning opportunities for KMb.

Connect with Monica:

The Advantages of Live Tweeting Events

When: April 23, 2015 at noon EST

Where: Twitter – follow #KMbChat and @KMbChat

Topic: Live Tweeting: A researcher’s perspective

 


 

Live Tweeting!

Live tweeting events is one of the top ways researchers, knowledge mobilizers, and other professionals share their knowledge. Whether you are sitting in a lecture, attending a conference, participating in a forum, or taking in a research talk, the advantage of live tweeting is instant knowledge mobilization.

Those of us following your tweets are instantly brought into the action. We learn through you and from you. Live tweeters share direct quotes from presenters, share resources. Other tweeters add their own spin to the knowledge shared. Live tweeting provides followers with instant access to not only the knowledge shared at the event, but to your unique perspective as well.

What is this chat about?

Join us on April 23, 2015 at noon EST for #KMbChat where we will explore the value of live tweeting events. Dr. Allison McDonald (@AEMcDonaldWLU), an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology at Wilfrid Laurier University, as she shares her own experiences with live tweeting research talks. We will:

  • discover the advantages of live tweeting
  • discuss the disadvantages of live tweeting
  • explore ways to encourage live tweeting among your colleagues and students
  • learn about the process and tools that capture this knowledge and what to do with it

Meet our moderator:

Allison McDonald is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario. All living things require energy to function, but the various ways that organisms do this are poorly understood. Dr. McDonald’s research program uses an in­tegrative and comparative framework and focuses on how organisms generate useful energy to survive. She studies plants, yeast, bacteria, and animals in her laboratory. Dr. McDonald has been blogging since December 2013 about issues pertaining to academic research, effective teaching, the professionalization of scientists, and women in science.


More About #KMbChat…

  • Have you missed a #KMbChat? 
  • Are you researching social media as a knowledge mobilization tool? #KMbChat data is available to you. 
  • Are you interested in moderating a future #KMbChat or have an idea about a future chat topic? 

KMbChat PDF – Evaluation – How to demonstrate success

#KMbChat LogoWhen: March 26, 2015 – noon EST

Where: Twitter! (#KMbChat)

Topic: Evaluation – How to demonstrate success in Knowledge Mobilization (KMb) for your institution/organization

What was this chat about?

How do we know that what we do works? How do we report this up the chain of command to our superiors, our funders, and share our successes with our colleagues? The key to all of this is measuring what matters and then packaging those measurements into easily understood documents that not only add value to the reader, but show us what we ought to continue doing and what we need to tweak. Nowhere is measurement and analysis more important than in our digital activities.

On March 26, 2015 at noon EST when Michael Johnny, Manager of Knowledge Mobilization for York University, helped us understand the importance of measuring, and analysis of those measures, knowledge mobilization activities as well as how to tell your story of success with the data.

 

Who is Michael Johnny?

Michael JohnnyMichael Johnny is the Manager of Knowledge Mobilization for York University.  He has over 13 years of experience in educational research and development. He has experience working both in a university research environment and at the community level planning, implementing, and evaluating social programs.

 

Find out more and connect!


More About #KMbChat…

  • Have you missed a #KMbChat? 
  • Are you researching social media as a knowledge mobilization tool? #KMbChat data is available to you. 
  • Are you interested in moderating a future #KMbChat or have an idea about a future chat topic? 

Social Media: Finding your soapbox

In the first post of this series, Figuring the Why Before the How, we took stock of your available resources, began thinking about what social tools are right for you, and reviewed the various assets you have at your disposal when implementing your social strategy.

The second post, Goals or Objectives, Getting to the heart of the matter, helped us think about what we are trying to achieve and aligning those goals or objectives with those of your organization’s overall communication and knowledge mobilization strategies. 

 
Now, it is time to discover your soapbox. A soap box, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, is “something that provides an outlet for delivering opinions.” This is exactly what a social media platform is – a tool, or platform, that helps you deliver your message across the globe through sharing what matters to you. There are many platforms that help spread your message, but let’s consider some of the more popular ones.

The modern day soapbox:

Each and every social media platform is good at something. Whether it is driving traffic to your website, increasing awareness about your favourite cause, or highlighting what you do, why you do it and how you do it, all social media tools have one thing in common – they are the modern day equivalent of a soapbox, which allow you to spread your message in an increasingly digitized and networked world. 
 
When choosing your soapbox, consider the following: 
  • which platforms best support your objectives or goals
  • which platforms do you have the capacity to implement and maintain
  • which resources are available to you
  • which resources do you need to acquire to provide unique and valuable content to your networks

Picking your soapbox:

The decision to use a platform or not is one that deserves your thoughtful attention. Make it easier by developing a criteria that is based upon your goals or objectives. Ask yourself about the value you will deliver to your network on the platform and the value that you will receive by being present on this platform. Since you cannot be everywhere, pick one or two platforms and learn them well before adding additional platforms. 
 

Popular soapboxes:

Facebook: This social networking site allows users to share and engage with their network. It is made up of communities where people interact with family, friends, co-workers, acquaintances, and others with similar interests and connections. Users email, video and voice chat, share files, blog, and join discussion groups. Facebook is good for:
  • boosting an organization’s visibility
  • driving traffic to your website
  • encouraging fund raising
  • promoting events
  • mobilizing and coordinating people
  • promoting a cause or idea
  • building community around your research or publications
Twitter: This micro-blogging and social networking platform provides real-time information, commentary, and descriptions of events and topics. Users send updates, in 140 characters or less, that are visible to their network on their timeline. Many share links to other information (articles, events, videos, pictures, websites) with their audiences. Twitter is good for:
  • developing relationships with your target audience
  • connecting with friends, colleagues, and institutions around the globe
  • monitoring conversations through hashtags
  • sharing helpful information, publications, and learning material
  • creating interest about an issue or cause
  • driving traffic to your website
YouTube: YouTube is one of the most popular web portals in the world and heralded as the second largest search engine. It allows users to submit videos, find videos by searching for keywords, and share their own ideas and values. YouTube is good for:
  • developing expertise
  • promoting ideas, products, and services
  • raising an organization’s visibility
  • showing research in action through short video clips and other animated formats
LinkedIn: This social networking site is the leading online professional directory of individual professionals and companies. It is good for:
researching people, companies, and industries. LinkedIn is also good for:
  • searching for jobs and recruiting professionals
  • establishing expertise
  • networking with members and organizations in your industry
  • allowing organizations and individuals to highlight what they do, why they do it, and how they do it through posting updates and developing profiles
  • staying up-to-date on the activities of your colleagues

Pinterest: This tool is essentially a digital pinboard – a place where you can collate and share your interests through photos, graphics, or any other visually appealing representation. Pinterest posts have the longest shelf life of any platform. Many pins continue to be shared and commented upon years after their original posting. Pinterest is good for:

  • developing and demonstrating your passions and expertise
  • increasing web traffic to blogs, websites, photos, publications, and many other digital representations of your work
  • helping your content become more visible
  • curating content that matters to you and your audience
Instagram: This photo and video sharing platform allows you to showcase your work and tell your story by sharing photos and video.You are instantly creating unique content. As soon as you upload an image or video, your audience can see and engage with your content. Instagram is good for:
  • developing trust with your audience by allowing you to show what you do, why you do it, and how do it (puts a face to your work)
  • highlighting issues, topics, events, and passions in action
  • communicating directly with your audience to build excitement around a topic or about an issue
Tumblr: This micro-blogging tool is a unique type of social network that allows you to share text, video, photos, and other blogs. Tumblr is good for:
  • building interactive communities
  • curating, or collecting, and sharing web content by “reblogging” or reposting blogs
Google Plus: This platform is Google’s answer to being social. GooglePlus allows more flexibility than Twitter as you are not limited to 140 characters. It uses circles to help you organize your connections and makes it easier to share content that they are interested in. GooglePlus is good for:
  • connecting with people with similar interests
  • connecting with colleagues and stakeholders through video (Google Hangout)
  • exploring who is talking about what and what they think about issues or topics
Wiki:  Wikis are spaces on the web where you can share documents, ideas, pictures, links, videos, and media. Wikis are collaborative and allow you to work with teams to capture and share your knowledge.  Wikis are good for:
  • housing all your content is in one place and making it accessible to a wider audience
  • connecting team members across organizations or projects, no matter where they are located
Other social media platforms include: blogs, online forums, and electronic newsletters. Even websites and group email have social elements.
 

Other soapboxes:

This list is by no means exhaustive. It does give you a place to start when thinking through the platforms that you will use. For a more comprehensive look at social media platforms for academics, I encourage you to check out Professor Andy Miah’s The A to Z of Social Media for Academia. Miah has organized social platforms into a regularly updated alphabetical listing – complete with links and brief descriptions. 
 

Are you social?

  • Which platforms do you use?
  • What are some of the goals or objectives for being social?
  • What value are you delivering or receiving from your networks and social activity?
  • How does being social help you spread your message, make the connections that matter, and create knowledge?
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